Egypt bars operation of Boeing 737 Max

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Egyptian aviation authorities have banned the operation of all Boeing 737 Max aircrafts, citing safety concerns.

The Egyptian Civil Aviation Authority says in a statement it has barred “flying over, landing and takeoff” of Boeing 737 Max aircrafts.

It said the civil aviation authority’s decision was precautionary. No time-frame was given for how long the jets would be barred.

It also says Egypt doesn’t have the Boeing 737 Max in its fleet and that they are not part of its future plans.

The announcement cites the Ethiopian Airlines crash on Sunday that killed 157 people on board.

An Ethiopian Airlines spokesman has said that the “black box” from the crashed Boeing jet will be sent overseas for analysis but no country has been chosen.

In an exclusive interview with The Associated Press, Asrat Begashaw says the airline has not decided where to send the data and voice records of the flight’s last moments.

He says that “we have a range of options. What we can say is we don’t have the capability to probe it here in Ethiopia.”

The Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft crashed shortly after takeoff Sunday, killing all 157 people on board. The disaster is the second with a Max 8 plane in just five months and has set off a wave of groundings of the planes around the world.

Much of the world, including the entire European Union, grounded the Boeing jetliner involved in the Ethiopian Airlines crash or banned it from their airspace, leaving the United States as one of the few remaining operators of the plane involved in two deadly accidents in five months.

The European Aviation Safety Agency took steps to keep the Boeing 737 Max 8 out of the air, joining Asian and Middle Eastern governments and carriers that also had safety concerns in the aftermath of Sunday’s crash, which killed all 157 people on board.

Referring to the Lion Air crash in Indonesia that killed 189 people last year, European regulators said Tuesday that “similar causes may have contributed to both events.”

British regulators indicated possible trouble with a reportedly damaged flight data recorder.

Titi